linux/include/linux/ipmi.h
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   1/*
   2 * ipmi.h
   3 *
   4 * MontaVista IPMI interface
   5 *
   6 * Author: MontaVista Software, Inc.
   7 *         Corey Minyard <minyard@mvista.com>
   8 *         source@mvista.com
   9 *
  10 * Copyright 2002 MontaVista Software Inc.
  11 *
  12 *  This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it
  13 *  under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by the
  14 *  Free Software Foundation; either version 2 of the License, or (at your
  15 *  option) any later version.
  16 *
  17 *
  18 *  THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED ``AS IS'' AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED
  19 *  WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF
  20 *  MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED.
  21 *  IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHOR BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT,
  22 *  INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING,
  23 *  BUT NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS
  24 *  OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND
  25 *  ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR
  26 *  TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE
  27 *  USE OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.
  28 *
  29 *  You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License along
  30 *  with this program; if not, write to the Free Software Foundation, Inc.,
  31 *  675 Mass Ave, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.
  32 */
  33#ifndef __LINUX_IPMI_H
  34#define __LINUX_IPMI_H
  35
  36#include <uapi/linux/ipmi.h>
  37
  38#include <linux/list.h>
  39#include <linux/proc_fs.h>
  40
  41struct module;
  42struct device;
  43
  44/* Opaque type for a IPMI message user.  One of these is needed to
  45   send and receive messages. */
  46typedef struct ipmi_user *ipmi_user_t;
  47
  48/*
  49 * Stuff coming from the receive interface comes as one of these.
  50 * They are allocated, the receiver must free them with
  51 * ipmi_free_recv_msg() when done with the message.  The link is not
  52 * used after the message is delivered, so the upper layer may use the
  53 * link to build a linked list, if it likes.
  54 */
  55struct ipmi_recv_msg {
  56        struct list_head link;
  57
  58        /* The type of message as defined in the "Receive Types"
  59           defines above. */
  60        int              recv_type;
  61
  62        ipmi_user_t      user;
  63        struct ipmi_addr addr;
  64        long             msgid;
  65        struct kernel_ipmi_msg  msg;
  66
  67        /* The user_msg_data is the data supplied when a message was
  68           sent, if this is a response to a sent message.  If this is
  69           not a response to a sent message, then user_msg_data will
  70           be NULL.  If the user above is NULL, then this will be the
  71           intf. */
  72        void             *user_msg_data;
  73
  74        /* Call this when done with the message.  It will presumably free
  75           the message and do any other necessary cleanup. */
  76        void (*done)(struct ipmi_recv_msg *msg);
  77
  78        /* Place-holder for the data, don't make any assumptions about
  79           the size or existence of this, since it may change. */
  80        unsigned char   msg_data[IPMI_MAX_MSG_LENGTH];
  81};
  82
  83/* Allocate and free the receive message. */
  84void ipmi_free_recv_msg(struct ipmi_recv_msg *msg);
  85
  86struct ipmi_user_hndl {
  87        /* Routine type to call when a message needs to be routed to
  88           the upper layer.  This will be called with some locks held,
  89           the only IPMI routines that can be called are ipmi_request
  90           and the alloc/free operations.  The handler_data is the
  91           variable supplied when the receive handler was registered. */
  92        void (*ipmi_recv_hndl)(struct ipmi_recv_msg *msg,
  93                               void                 *user_msg_data);
  94
  95        /* Called when the interface detects a watchdog pre-timeout.  If
  96           this is NULL, it will be ignored for the user. */
  97        void (*ipmi_watchdog_pretimeout)(void *handler_data);
  98};
  99
 100/* Create a new user of the IPMI layer on the given interface number. */
 101int ipmi_create_user(unsigned int          if_num,
 102                     struct ipmi_user_hndl *handler,
 103                     void                  *handler_data,
 104                     ipmi_user_t           *user);
 105
 106/* Destroy the given user of the IPMI layer.  Note that after this
 107   function returns, the system is guaranteed to not call any
 108   callbacks for the user.  Thus as long as you destroy all the users
 109   before you unload a module, you will be safe.  And if you destroy
 110   the users before you destroy the callback structures, it should be
 111   safe, too. */
 112int ipmi_destroy_user(ipmi_user_t user);
 113
 114/* Get the IPMI version of the BMC we are talking to. */
 115void ipmi_get_version(ipmi_user_t   user,
 116                      unsigned char *major,
 117                      unsigned char *minor);
 118
 119/* Set and get the slave address and LUN that we will use for our
 120   source messages.  Note that this affects the interface, not just
 121   this user, so it will affect all users of this interface.  This is
 122   so some initialization code can come in and do the OEM-specific
 123   things it takes to determine your address (if not the BMC) and set
 124   it for everyone else.  Note that each channel can have its own address. */
 125int ipmi_set_my_address(ipmi_user_t   user,
 126                        unsigned int  channel,
 127                        unsigned char address);
 128int ipmi_get_my_address(ipmi_user_t   user,
 129                        unsigned int  channel,
 130                        unsigned char *address);
 131int ipmi_set_my_LUN(ipmi_user_t   user,
 132                    unsigned int  channel,
 133                    unsigned char LUN);
 134int ipmi_get_my_LUN(ipmi_user_t   user,
 135                    unsigned int  channel,
 136                    unsigned char *LUN);
 137
 138/*
 139 * Like ipmi_request, but lets you specify the number of retries and
 140 * the retry time.  The retries is the number of times the message
 141 * will be resent if no reply is received.  If set to -1, the default
 142 * value will be used.  The retry time is the time in milliseconds
 143 * between retries.  If set to zero, the default value will be
 144 * used.
 145 *
 146 * Don't use this unless you *really* have to.  It's primarily for the
 147 * IPMI over LAN converter; since the LAN stuff does its own retries,
 148 * it makes no sense to do it here.  However, this can be used if you
 149 * have unusual requirements.
 150 */
 151int ipmi_request_settime(ipmi_user_t      user,
 152                         struct ipmi_addr *addr,
 153                         long             msgid,
 154                         struct kernel_ipmi_msg  *msg,
 155                         void             *user_msg_data,
 156                         int              priority,
 157                         int              max_retries,
 158                         unsigned int     retry_time_ms);
 159
 160/*
 161 * Like ipmi_request, but with messages supplied.  This will not
 162 * allocate any memory, and the messages may be statically allocated
 163 * (just make sure to do the "done" handling on them).  Note that this
 164 * is primarily for the watchdog timer, since it should be able to
 165 * send messages even if no memory is available.  This is subject to
 166 * change as the system changes, so don't use it unless you REALLY
 167 * have to.
 168 */
 169int ipmi_request_supply_msgs(ipmi_user_t          user,
 170                             struct ipmi_addr     *addr,
 171                             long                 msgid,
 172                             struct kernel_ipmi_msg *msg,
 173                             void                 *user_msg_data,
 174                             void                 *supplied_smi,
 175                             struct ipmi_recv_msg *supplied_recv,
 176                             int                  priority);
 177
 178/*
 179 * Poll the IPMI interface for the user.  This causes the IPMI code to
 180 * do an immediate check for information from the driver and handle
 181 * anything that is immediately pending.  This will not block in any
 182 * way.  This is useful if you need to spin waiting for something to
 183 * happen in the IPMI driver.
 184 */
 185void ipmi_poll_interface(ipmi_user_t user);
 186
 187/*
 188 * When commands come in to the SMS, the user can register to receive
 189 * them.  Only one user can be listening on a specific netfn/cmd/chan tuple
 190 * at a time, you will get an EBUSY error if the command is already
 191 * registered.  If a command is received that does not have a user
 192 * registered, the driver will automatically return the proper
 193 * error.  Channels are specified as a bitfield, use IPMI_CHAN_ALL to
 194 * mean all channels.
 195 */
 196int ipmi_register_for_cmd(ipmi_user_t   user,
 197                          unsigned char netfn,
 198                          unsigned char cmd,
 199                          unsigned int  chans);
 200int ipmi_unregister_for_cmd(ipmi_user_t   user,
 201                            unsigned char netfn,
 202                            unsigned char cmd,
 203                            unsigned int  chans);
 204
 205/*
 206 * Go into a mode where the driver will not autonomously attempt to do
 207 * things with the interface.  It will still respond to attentions and
 208 * interrupts, and it will expect that commands will complete.  It
 209 * will not automatcially check for flags, events, or things of that
 210 * nature.
 211 *
 212 * This is primarily used for firmware upgrades.  The idea is that
 213 * when you go into firmware upgrade mode, you do this operation
 214 * and the driver will not attempt to do anything but what you tell
 215 * it or what the BMC asks for.
 216 *
 217 * Note that if you send a command that resets the BMC, the driver
 218 * will still expect a response from that command.  So the BMC should
 219 * reset itself *after* the response is sent.  Resetting before the
 220 * response is just silly.
 221 *
 222 * If in auto maintenance mode, the driver will automatically go into
 223 * maintenance mode for 30 seconds if it sees a cold reset, a warm
 224 * reset, or a firmware NetFN.  This means that code that uses only
 225 * firmware NetFN commands to do upgrades will work automatically
 226 * without change, assuming it sends a message every 30 seconds or
 227 * less.
 228 *
 229 * See the IPMI_MAINTENANCE_MODE_xxx defines for what the mode means.
 230 */
 231int ipmi_get_maintenance_mode(ipmi_user_t user);
 232int ipmi_set_maintenance_mode(ipmi_user_t user, int mode);
 233
 234/*
 235 * When the user is created, it will not receive IPMI events by
 236 * default.  The user must set this to TRUE to get incoming events.
 237 * The first user that sets this to TRUE will receive all events that
 238 * have been queued while no one was waiting for events.
 239 */
 240int ipmi_set_gets_events(ipmi_user_t user, int val);
 241
 242/*
 243 * Called when a new SMI is registered.  This will also be called on
 244 * every existing interface when a new watcher is registered with
 245 * ipmi_smi_watcher_register().
 246 */
 247struct ipmi_smi_watcher {
 248        struct list_head link;
 249
 250        /* You must set the owner to the current module, if you are in
 251           a module (generally just set it to "THIS_MODULE"). */
 252        struct module *owner;
 253
 254        /* These two are called with read locks held for the interface
 255           the watcher list.  So you can add and remove users from the
 256           IPMI interface, send messages, etc., but you cannot add
 257           or remove SMI watchers or SMI interfaces. */
 258        void (*new_smi)(int if_num, struct device *dev);
 259        void (*smi_gone)(int if_num);
 260};
 261
 262int ipmi_smi_watcher_register(struct ipmi_smi_watcher *watcher);
 263int ipmi_smi_watcher_unregister(struct ipmi_smi_watcher *watcher);
 264
 265/* The following are various helper functions for dealing with IPMI
 266   addresses. */
 267
 268/* Return the maximum length of an IPMI address given it's type. */
 269unsigned int ipmi_addr_length(int addr_type);
 270
 271/* Validate that the given IPMI address is valid. */
 272int ipmi_validate_addr(struct ipmi_addr *addr, int len);
 273
 274/*
 275 * How did the IPMI driver find out about the device?
 276 */
 277enum ipmi_addr_src {
 278        SI_INVALID = 0, SI_HOTMOD, SI_HARDCODED, SI_SPMI, SI_ACPI, SI_SMBIOS,
 279        SI_PCI, SI_DEVICETREE, SI_DEFAULT
 280};
 281
 282union ipmi_smi_info_union {
 283        /*
 284         * the acpi_info element is defined for the SI_ACPI
 285         * address type
 286         */
 287        struct {
 288                void *acpi_handle;
 289        } acpi_info;
 290};
 291
 292struct ipmi_smi_info {
 293        enum ipmi_addr_src addr_src;
 294
 295        /*
 296         * Base device for the interface.  Don't forget to put this when
 297         * you are done.
 298         */
 299        struct device *dev;
 300
 301        /*
 302         * The addr_info provides more detailed info for some IPMI
 303         * devices, depending on the addr_src.  Currently only SI_ACPI
 304         * info is provided.
 305         */
 306        union ipmi_smi_info_union addr_info;
 307};
 308
 309/* This is to get the private info of ipmi_smi_t */
 310extern int ipmi_get_smi_info(int if_num, struct ipmi_smi_info *data);
 311
 312#endif /* __LINUX_IPMI_H */
 313
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