linux/include/linux/pm.h
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   1/*
   2 *  pm.h - Power management interface
   3 *
   4 *  Copyright (C) 2000 Andrew Henroid
   5 *
   6 *  This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify
   7 *  it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
   8 *  the Free Software Foundation; either version 2 of the License, or
   9 *  (at your option) any later version.
  10 *
  11 *  This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
  12 *  but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
  13 *  MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the
  14 *  GNU General Public License for more details.
  15 *
  16 *  You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
  17 *  along with this program; if not, write to the Free Software
  18 *  Foundation, Inc., 59 Temple Place, Suite 330, Boston, MA  02111-1307  USA
  19 */
  20
  21#ifndef _LINUX_PM_H
  22#define _LINUX_PM_H
  23
  24#include <linux/list.h>
  25#include <linux/workqueue.h>
  26#include <linux/spinlock.h>
  27#include <linux/wait.h>
  28#include <linux/timer.h>
  29#include <linux/completion.h>
  30
  31/*
  32 * Callbacks for platform drivers to implement.
  33 */
  34extern void (*pm_idle)(void);
  35extern void (*pm_power_off)(void);
  36extern void (*pm_power_off_prepare)(void);
  37
  38/*
  39 * Device power management
  40 */
  41
  42struct device;
  43
  44#ifdef CONFIG_PM
  45extern const char power_group_name[];           /* = "power" */
  46#else
  47#define power_group_name        NULL
  48#endif
  49
  50typedef struct pm_message {
  51        int event;
  52} pm_message_t;
  53
  54/**
  55 * struct dev_pm_ops - device PM callbacks
  56 *
  57 * Several device power state transitions are externally visible, affecting
  58 * the state of pending I/O queues and (for drivers that touch hardware)
  59 * interrupts, wakeups, DMA, and other hardware state.  There may also be
  60 * internal transitions to various low-power modes which are transparent
  61 * to the rest of the driver stack (such as a driver that's ON gating off
  62 * clocks which are not in active use).
  63 *
  64 * The externally visible transitions are handled with the help of callbacks
  65 * included in this structure in such a way that two levels of callbacks are
  66 * involved.  First, the PM core executes callbacks provided by PM domains,
  67 * device types, classes and bus types.  They are the subsystem-level callbacks
  68 * supposed to execute callbacks provided by device drivers, although they may
  69 * choose not to do that.  If the driver callbacks are executed, they have to
  70 * collaborate with the subsystem-level callbacks to achieve the goals
  71 * appropriate for the given system transition, given transition phase and the
  72 * subsystem the device belongs to.
  73 *
  74 * @prepare: The principal role of this callback is to prevent new children of
  75 *      the device from being registered after it has returned (the driver's
  76 *      subsystem and generally the rest of the kernel is supposed to prevent
  77 *      new calls to the probe method from being made too once @prepare() has
  78 *      succeeded).  If @prepare() detects a situation it cannot handle (e.g.
  79 *      registration of a child already in progress), it may return -EAGAIN, so
  80 *      that the PM core can execute it once again (e.g. after a new child has
  81 *      been registered) to recover from the race condition.
  82 *      This method is executed for all kinds of suspend transitions and is
  83 *      followed by one of the suspend callbacks: @suspend(), @freeze(), or
  84 *      @poweroff().  The PM core executes subsystem-level @prepare() for all
  85 *      devices before starting to invoke suspend callbacks for any of them, so
  86 *      generally devices may be assumed to be functional or to respond to
  87 *      runtime resume requests while @prepare() is being executed.  However,
  88 *      device drivers may NOT assume anything about the availability of user
  89 *      space at that time and it is NOT valid to request firmware from within
  90 *      @prepare() (it's too late to do that).  It also is NOT valid to allocate
  91 *      substantial amounts of memory from @prepare() in the GFP_KERNEL mode.
  92 *      [To work around these limitations, drivers may register suspend and
  93 *      hibernation notifiers to be executed before the freezing of tasks.]
  94 *
  95 * @complete: Undo the changes made by @prepare().  This method is executed for
  96 *      all kinds of resume transitions, following one of the resume callbacks:
  97 *      @resume(), @thaw(), @restore().  Also called if the state transition
  98 *      fails before the driver's suspend callback: @suspend(), @freeze() or
  99 *      @poweroff(), can be executed (e.g. if the suspend callback fails for one
 100 *      of the other devices that the PM core has unsuccessfully attempted to
 101 *      suspend earlier).
 102 *      The PM core executes subsystem-level @complete() after it has executed
 103 *      the appropriate resume callbacks for all devices.
 104 *
 105 * @suspend: Executed before putting the system into a sleep state in which the
 106 *      contents of main memory are preserved.  The exact action to perform
 107 *      depends on the device's subsystem (PM domain, device type, class or bus
 108 *      type), but generally the device must be quiescent after subsystem-level
 109 *      @suspend() has returned, so that it doesn't do any I/O or DMA.
 110 *      Subsystem-level @suspend() is executed for all devices after invoking
 111 *      subsystem-level @prepare() for all of them.
 112 *
 113 * @suspend_late: Continue operations started by @suspend().  For a number of
 114 *      devices @suspend_late() may point to the same callback routine as the
 115 *      runtime suspend callback.
 116 *
 117 * @resume: Executed after waking the system up from a sleep state in which the
 118 *      contents of main memory were preserved.  The exact action to perform
 119 *      depends on the device's subsystem, but generally the driver is expected
 120 *      to start working again, responding to hardware events and software
 121 *      requests (the device itself may be left in a low-power state, waiting
 122 *      for a runtime resume to occur).  The state of the device at the time its
 123 *      driver's @resume() callback is run depends on the platform and subsystem
 124 *      the device belongs to.  On most platforms, there are no restrictions on
 125 *      availability of resources like clocks during @resume().
 126 *      Subsystem-level @resume() is executed for all devices after invoking
 127 *      subsystem-level @resume_noirq() for all of them.
 128 *
 129 * @resume_early: Prepare to execute @resume().  For a number of devices
 130 *      @resume_early() may point to the same callback routine as the runtime
 131 *      resume callback.
 132 *
 133 * @freeze: Hibernation-specific, executed before creating a hibernation image.
 134 *      Analogous to @suspend(), but it should not enable the device to signal
 135 *      wakeup events or change its power state.  The majority of subsystems
 136 *      (with the notable exception of the PCI bus type) expect the driver-level
 137 *      @freeze() to save the device settings in memory to be used by @restore()
 138 *      during the subsequent resume from hibernation.
 139 *      Subsystem-level @freeze() is executed for all devices after invoking
 140 *      subsystem-level @prepare() for all of them.
 141 *
 142 * @freeze_late: Continue operations started by @freeze().  Analogous to
 143 *      @suspend_late(), but it should not enable the device to signal wakeup
 144 *      events or change its power state.
 145 *
 146 * @thaw: Hibernation-specific, executed after creating a hibernation image OR
 147 *      if the creation of an image has failed.  Also executed after a failing
 148 *      attempt to restore the contents of main memory from such an image.
 149 *      Undo the changes made by the preceding @freeze(), so the device can be
 150 *      operated in the same way as immediately before the call to @freeze().
 151 *      Subsystem-level @thaw() is executed for all devices after invoking
 152 *      subsystem-level @thaw_noirq() for all of them.  It also may be executed
 153 *      directly after @freeze() in case of a transition error.
 154 *
 155 * @thaw_early: Prepare to execute @thaw().  Undo the changes made by the
 156 *      preceding @freeze_late().
 157 *
 158 * @poweroff: Hibernation-specific, executed after saving a hibernation image.
 159 *      Analogous to @suspend(), but it need not save the device's settings in
 160 *      memory.
 161 *      Subsystem-level @poweroff() is executed for all devices after invoking
 162 *      subsystem-level @prepare() for all of them.
 163 *
 164 * @poweroff_late: Continue operations started by @poweroff().  Analogous to
 165 *      @suspend_late(), but it need not save the device's settings in memory.
 166 *
 167 * @restore: Hibernation-specific, executed after restoring the contents of main
 168 *      memory from a hibernation image, analogous to @resume().
 169 *
 170 * @restore_early: Prepare to execute @restore(), analogous to @resume_early().
 171 *
 172 * @suspend_noirq: Complete the actions started by @suspend().  Carry out any
 173 *      additional operations required for suspending the device that might be
 174 *      racing with its driver's interrupt handler, which is guaranteed not to
 175 *      run while @suspend_noirq() is being executed.
 176 *      It generally is expected that the device will be in a low-power state
 177 *      (appropriate for the target system sleep state) after subsystem-level
 178 *      @suspend_noirq() has returned successfully.  If the device can generate
 179 *      system wakeup signals and is enabled to wake up the system, it should be
 180 *      configured to do so at that time.  However, depending on the platform
 181 *      and device's subsystem, @suspend() or @suspend_late() may be allowed to
 182 *      put the device into the low-power state and configure it to generate
 183 *      wakeup signals, in which case it generally is not necessary to define
 184 *      @suspend_noirq().
 185 *
 186 * @resume_noirq: Prepare for the execution of @resume() by carrying out any
 187 *      operations required for resuming the device that might be racing with
 188 *      its driver's interrupt handler, which is guaranteed not to run while
 189 *      @resume_noirq() is being executed.
 190 *
 191 * @freeze_noirq: Complete the actions started by @freeze().  Carry out any
 192 *      additional operations required for freezing the device that might be
 193 *      racing with its driver's interrupt handler, which is guaranteed not to
 194 *      run while @freeze_noirq() is being executed.
 195 *      The power state of the device should not be changed by either @freeze(),
 196 *      or @freeze_late(), or @freeze_noirq() and it should not be configured to
 197 *      signal system wakeup by any of these callbacks.
 198 *
 199 * @thaw_noirq: Prepare for the execution of @thaw() by carrying out any
 200 *      operations required for thawing the device that might be racing with its
 201 *      driver's interrupt handler, which is guaranteed not to run while
 202 *      @thaw_noirq() is being executed.
 203 *
 204 * @poweroff_noirq: Complete the actions started by @poweroff().  Analogous to
 205 *      @suspend_noirq(), but it need not save the device's settings in memory.
 206 *
 207 * @restore_noirq: Prepare for the execution of @restore() by carrying out any
 208 *      operations required for thawing the device that might be racing with its
 209 *      driver's interrupt handler, which is guaranteed not to run while
 210 *      @restore_noirq() is being executed.  Analogous to @resume_noirq().
 211 *
 212 * All of the above callbacks, except for @complete(), return error codes.
 213 * However, the error codes returned by the resume operations, @resume(),
 214 * @thaw(), @restore(), @resume_noirq(), @thaw_noirq(), and @restore_noirq(), do
 215 * not cause the PM core to abort the resume transition during which they are
 216 * returned.  The error codes returned in those cases are only printed by the PM
 217 * core to the system logs for debugging purposes.  Still, it is recommended
 218 * that drivers only return error codes from their resume methods in case of an
 219 * unrecoverable failure (i.e. when the device being handled refuses to resume
 220 * and becomes unusable) to allow us to modify the PM core in the future, so
 221 * that it can avoid attempting to handle devices that failed to resume and
 222 * their children.
 223 *
 224 * It is allowed to unregister devices while the above callbacks are being
 225 * executed.  However, a callback routine must NOT try to unregister the device
 226 * it was called for, although it may unregister children of that device (for
 227 * example, if it detects that a child was unplugged while the system was
 228 * asleep).
 229 *
 230 * Refer to Documentation/power/devices.txt for more information about the role
 231 * of the above callbacks in the system suspend process.
 232 *
 233 * There also are callbacks related to runtime power management of devices.
 234 * Again, these callbacks are executed by the PM core only for subsystems
 235 * (PM domains, device types, classes and bus types) and the subsystem-level
 236 * callbacks are supposed to invoke the driver callbacks.  Moreover, the exact
 237 * actions to be performed by a device driver's callbacks generally depend on
 238 * the platform and subsystem the device belongs to.
 239 *
 240 * @runtime_suspend: Prepare the device for a condition in which it won't be
 241 *      able to communicate with the CPU(s) and RAM due to power management.
 242 *      This need not mean that the device should be put into a low-power state.
 243 *      For example, if the device is behind a link which is about to be turned
 244 *      off, the device may remain at full power.  If the device does go to low
 245 *      power and is capable of generating runtime wakeup events, remote wakeup
 246 *      (i.e., a hardware mechanism allowing the device to request a change of
 247 *      its power state via an interrupt) should be enabled for it.
 248 *
 249 * @runtime_resume: Put the device into the fully active state in response to a
 250 *      wakeup event generated by hardware or at the request of software.  If
 251 *      necessary, put the device into the full-power state and restore its
 252 *      registers, so that it is fully operational.
 253 *
 254 * @runtime_idle: Device appears to be inactive and it might be put into a
 255 *      low-power state if all of the necessary conditions are satisfied.  Check
 256 *      these conditions and handle the device as appropriate, possibly queueing
 257 *      a suspend request for it.  The return value is ignored by the PM core.
 258 *
 259 * Refer to Documentation/power/runtime_pm.txt for more information about the
 260 * role of the above callbacks in device runtime power management.
 261 *
 262 */
 263
 264struct dev_pm_ops {
 265        int (*prepare)(struct device *dev);
 266        void (*complete)(struct device *dev);
 267        int (*suspend)(struct device *dev);
 268        int (*resume)(struct device *dev);
 269        int (*freeze)(struct device *dev);
 270        int (*thaw)(struct device *dev);
 271        int (*poweroff)(struct device *dev);
 272        int (*restore)(struct device *dev);
 273        int (*suspend_late)(struct device *dev);
 274        int (*resume_early)(struct device *dev);
 275        int (*freeze_late)(struct device *dev);
 276        int (*thaw_early)(struct device *dev);
 277        int (*poweroff_late)(struct device *dev);
 278        int (*restore_early)(struct device *dev);
 279        int (*suspend_noirq)(struct device *dev);
 280        int (*resume_noirq)(struct device *dev);
 281        int (*freeze_noirq)(struct device *dev);
 282        int (*thaw_noirq)(struct device *dev);
 283        int (*poweroff_noirq)(struct device *dev);
 284        int (*restore_noirq)(struct device *dev);
 285        int (*runtime_suspend)(struct device *dev);
 286        int (*runtime_resume)(struct device *dev);
 287        int (*runtime_idle)(struct device *dev);
 288};
 289
 290#ifdef CONFIG_PM_SLEEP
 291#define SET_SYSTEM_SLEEP_PM_OPS(suspend_fn, resume_fn) \
 292        .suspend = suspend_fn, \
 293        .resume = resume_fn, \
 294        .freeze = suspend_fn, \
 295        .thaw = resume_fn, \
 296        .poweroff = suspend_fn, \
 297        .restore = resume_fn,
 298#else
 299#define SET_SYSTEM_SLEEP_PM_OPS(suspend_fn, resume_fn)
 300#endif
 301
 302#ifdef CONFIG_PM_RUNTIME
 303#define SET_RUNTIME_PM_OPS(suspend_fn, resume_fn, idle_fn) \
 304        .runtime_suspend = suspend_fn, \
 305        .runtime_resume = resume_fn, \
 306        .runtime_idle = idle_fn,
 307#else
 308#define SET_RUNTIME_PM_OPS(suspend_fn, resume_fn, idle_fn)
 309#endif
 310
 311/*
 312 * Use this if you want to use the same suspend and resume callbacks for suspend
 313 * to RAM and hibernation.
 314 */
 315#define SIMPLE_DEV_PM_OPS(name, suspend_fn, resume_fn) \
 316const struct dev_pm_ops name = { \
 317        SET_SYSTEM_SLEEP_PM_OPS(suspend_fn, resume_fn) \
 318}
 319
 320/*
 321 * Use this for defining a set of PM operations to be used in all situations
 322 * (sustem suspend, hibernation or runtime PM).
 323 * NOTE: In general, system suspend callbacks, .suspend() and .resume(), should
 324 * be different from the corresponding runtime PM callbacks, .runtime_suspend(),
 325 * and .runtime_resume(), because .runtime_suspend() always works on an already
 326 * quiescent device, while .suspend() should assume that the device may be doing
 327 * something when it is called (it should ensure that the device will be
 328 * quiescent after it has returned).  Therefore it's better to point the "late"
 329 * suspend and "early" resume callback pointers, .suspend_late() and
 330 * .resume_early(), to the same routines as .runtime_suspend() and
 331 * .runtime_resume(), respectively (and analogously for hibernation).
 332 */
 333#define UNIVERSAL_DEV_PM_OPS(name, suspend_fn, resume_fn, idle_fn) \
 334const struct dev_pm_ops name = { \
 335        SET_SYSTEM_SLEEP_PM_OPS(suspend_fn, resume_fn) \
 336        SET_RUNTIME_PM_OPS(suspend_fn, resume_fn, idle_fn) \
 337}
 338
 339/**
 340 * PM_EVENT_ messages
 341 *
 342 * The following PM_EVENT_ messages are defined for the internal use of the PM
 343 * core, in order to provide a mechanism allowing the high level suspend and
 344 * hibernation code to convey the necessary information to the device PM core
 345 * code:
 346 *
 347 * ON           No transition.
 348 *
 349 * FREEZE       System is going to hibernate, call ->prepare() and ->freeze()
 350 *              for all devices.
 351 *
 352 * SUSPEND      System is going to suspend, call ->prepare() and ->suspend()
 353 *              for all devices.
 354 *
 355 * HIBERNATE    Hibernation image has been saved, call ->prepare() and
 356 *              ->poweroff() for all devices.
 357 *
 358 * QUIESCE      Contents of main memory are going to be restored from a (loaded)
 359 *              hibernation image, call ->prepare() and ->freeze() for all
 360 *              devices.
 361 *
 362 * RESUME       System is resuming, call ->resume() and ->complete() for all
 363 *              devices.
 364 *
 365 * THAW         Hibernation image has been created, call ->thaw() and
 366 *              ->complete() for all devices.
 367 *
 368 * RESTORE      Contents of main memory have been restored from a hibernation
 369 *              image, call ->restore() and ->complete() for all devices.
 370 *
 371 * RECOVER      Creation of a hibernation image or restoration of the main
 372 *              memory contents from a hibernation image has failed, call
 373 *              ->thaw() and ->complete() for all devices.
 374 *
 375 * The following PM_EVENT_ messages are defined for internal use by
 376 * kernel subsystems.  They are never issued by the PM core.
 377 *
 378 * USER_SUSPEND         Manual selective suspend was issued by userspace.
 379 *
 380 * USER_RESUME          Manual selective resume was issued by userspace.
 381 *
 382 * REMOTE_WAKEUP        Remote-wakeup request was received from the device.
 383 *
 384 * AUTO_SUSPEND         Automatic (device idle) runtime suspend was
 385 *                      initiated by the subsystem.
 386 *
 387 * AUTO_RESUME          Automatic (device needed) runtime resume was
 388 *                      requested by a driver.
 389 */
 390
 391#define PM_EVENT_INVALID        (-1)
 392#define PM_EVENT_ON             0x0000
 393#define PM_EVENT_FREEZE         0x0001
 394#define PM_EVENT_SUSPEND        0x0002
 395#define PM_EVENT_HIBERNATE      0x0004
 396#define PM_EVENT_QUIESCE        0x0008
 397#define PM_EVENT_RESUME         0x0010
 398#define PM_EVENT_THAW           0x0020
 399#define PM_EVENT_RESTORE        0x0040
 400#define PM_EVENT_RECOVER        0x0080
 401#define PM_EVENT_USER           0x0100
 402#define PM_EVENT_REMOTE         0x0200
 403#define PM_EVENT_AUTO           0x0400
 404
 405#define PM_EVENT_SLEEP          (PM_EVENT_SUSPEND | PM_EVENT_HIBERNATE)
 406#define PM_EVENT_USER_SUSPEND   (PM_EVENT_USER | PM_EVENT_SUSPEND)
 407#define PM_EVENT_USER_RESUME    (PM_EVENT_USER | PM_EVENT_RESUME)
 408#define PM_EVENT_REMOTE_RESUME  (PM_EVENT_REMOTE | PM_EVENT_RESUME)
 409#define PM_EVENT_AUTO_SUSPEND   (PM_EVENT_AUTO | PM_EVENT_SUSPEND)
 410#define PM_EVENT_AUTO_RESUME    (PM_EVENT_AUTO | PM_EVENT_RESUME)
 411
 412#define PMSG_INVALID    ((struct pm_message){ .event = PM_EVENT_INVALID, })
 413#define PMSG_ON         ((struct pm_message){ .event = PM_EVENT_ON, })
 414#define PMSG_FREEZE     ((struct pm_message){ .event = PM_EVENT_FREEZE, })
 415#define PMSG_QUIESCE    ((struct pm_message){ .event = PM_EVENT_QUIESCE, })
 416#define PMSG_SUSPEND    ((struct pm_message){ .event = PM_EVENT_SUSPEND, })
 417#define PMSG_HIBERNATE  ((struct pm_message){ .event = PM_EVENT_HIBERNATE, })
 418#define PMSG_RESUME     ((struct pm_message){ .event = PM_EVENT_RESUME, })
 419#define PMSG_THAW       ((struct pm_message){ .event = PM_EVENT_THAW, })
 420#define PMSG_RESTORE    ((struct pm_message){ .event = PM_EVENT_RESTORE, })
 421#define PMSG_RECOVER    ((struct pm_message){ .event = PM_EVENT_RECOVER, })
 422#define PMSG_USER_SUSPEND       ((struct pm_message) \
 423                                        { .event = PM_EVENT_USER_SUSPEND, })
 424#define PMSG_USER_RESUME        ((struct pm_message) \
 425                                        { .event = PM_EVENT_USER_RESUME, })
 426#define PMSG_REMOTE_RESUME      ((struct pm_message) \
 427                                        { .event = PM_EVENT_REMOTE_RESUME, })
 428#define PMSG_AUTO_SUSPEND       ((struct pm_message) \
 429                                        { .event = PM_EVENT_AUTO_SUSPEND, })
 430#define PMSG_AUTO_RESUME        ((struct pm_message) \
 431                                        { .event = PM_EVENT_AUTO_RESUME, })
 432
 433#define PMSG_IS_AUTO(msg)       (((msg).event & PM_EVENT_AUTO) != 0)
 434
 435/**
 436 * Device run-time power management status.
 437 *
 438 * These status labels are used internally by the PM core to indicate the
 439 * current status of a device with respect to the PM core operations.  They do
 440 * not reflect the actual power state of the device or its status as seen by the
 441 * driver.
 442 *
 443 * RPM_ACTIVE           Device is fully operational.  Indicates that the device
 444 *                      bus type's ->runtime_resume() callback has completed
 445 *                      successfully.
 446 *
 447 * RPM_SUSPENDED        Device bus type's ->runtime_suspend() callback has
 448 *                      completed successfully.  The device is regarded as
 449 *                      suspended.
 450 *
 451 * RPM_RESUMING         Device bus type's ->runtime_resume() callback is being
 452 *                      executed.
 453 *
 454 * RPM_SUSPENDING       Device bus type's ->runtime_suspend() callback is being
 455 *                      executed.
 456 */
 457
 458enum rpm_status {
 459        RPM_ACTIVE = 0,
 460        RPM_RESUMING,
 461        RPM_SUSPENDED,
 462        RPM_SUSPENDING,
 463};
 464
 465/**
 466 * Device run-time power management request types.
 467 *
 468 * RPM_REQ_NONE         Do nothing.
 469 *
 470 * RPM_REQ_IDLE         Run the device bus type's ->runtime_idle() callback
 471 *
 472 * RPM_REQ_SUSPEND      Run the device bus type's ->runtime_suspend() callback
 473 *
 474 * RPM_REQ_AUTOSUSPEND  Same as RPM_REQ_SUSPEND, but not until the device has
 475 *                      been inactive for as long as power.autosuspend_delay
 476 *
 477 * RPM_REQ_RESUME       Run the device bus type's ->runtime_resume() callback
 478 */
 479
 480enum rpm_request {
 481        RPM_REQ_NONE = 0,
 482        RPM_REQ_IDLE,
 483        RPM_REQ_SUSPEND,
 484        RPM_REQ_AUTOSUSPEND,
 485        RPM_REQ_RESUME,
 486};
 487
 488struct wakeup_source;
 489
 490struct pm_domain_data {
 491        struct list_head list_node;
 492        struct device *dev;
 493};
 494
 495struct pm_subsys_data {
 496        spinlock_t lock;
 497        unsigned int refcount;
 498#ifdef CONFIG_PM_CLK
 499        struct list_head clock_list;
 500#endif
 501#ifdef CONFIG_PM_GENERIC_DOMAINS
 502        struct pm_domain_data *domain_data;
 503#endif
 504};
 505
 506struct dev_pm_info {
 507        pm_message_t            power_state;
 508        unsigned int            can_wakeup:1;
 509        unsigned int            async_suspend:1;
 510        bool                    is_prepared:1;  /* Owned by the PM core */
 511        bool                    is_suspended:1; /* Ditto */
 512        bool                    ignore_children:1;
 513        bool                    early_init:1;   /* Owned by the PM core */
 514        spinlock_t              lock;
 515#ifdef CONFIG_PM_SLEEP
 516        struct list_head        entry;
 517        struct completion       completion;
 518        struct wakeup_source    *wakeup;
 519        bool                    wakeup_path:1;
 520        bool                    syscore:1;
 521#else
 522        unsigned int            should_wakeup:1;
 523#endif
 524#ifdef CONFIG_PM_RUNTIME
 525        struct timer_list       suspend_timer;
 526        unsigned long           timer_expires;
 527        struct work_struct      work;
 528        wait_queue_head_t       wait_queue;
 529        atomic_t                usage_count;
 530        atomic_t                child_count;
 531        unsigned int            disable_depth:3;
 532        unsigned int            idle_notification:1;
 533        unsigned int            request_pending:1;
 534        unsigned int            deferred_resume:1;
 535        unsigned int            run_wake:1;
 536        unsigned int            runtime_auto:1;
 537        unsigned int            no_callbacks:1;
 538        unsigned int            irq_safe:1;
 539        unsigned int            use_autosuspend:1;
 540        unsigned int            timer_autosuspends:1;
 541        enum rpm_request        request;
 542        enum rpm_status         runtime_status;
 543        int                     runtime_error;
 544        int                     autosuspend_delay;
 545        unsigned long           last_busy;
 546        unsigned long           active_jiffies;
 547        unsigned long           suspended_jiffies;
 548        unsigned long           accounting_timestamp;
 549#endif
 550        struct pm_subsys_data   *subsys_data;  /* Owned by the subsystem. */
 551        struct dev_pm_qos       *qos;
 552};
 553
 554extern void update_pm_runtime_accounting(struct device *dev);
 555extern int dev_pm_get_subsys_data(struct device *dev);
 556extern int dev_pm_put_subsys_data(struct device *dev);
 557
 558/*
 559 * Power domains provide callbacks that are executed during system suspend,
 560 * hibernation, system resume and during runtime PM transitions along with
 561 * subsystem-level and driver-level callbacks.
 562 */
 563struct dev_pm_domain {
 564        struct dev_pm_ops       ops;
 565};
 566
 567/*
 568 * The PM_EVENT_ messages are also used by drivers implementing the legacy
 569 * suspend framework, based on the ->suspend() and ->resume() callbacks common
 570 * for suspend and hibernation transitions, according to the rules below.
 571 */
 572
 573/* Necessary, because several drivers use PM_EVENT_PRETHAW */
 574#define PM_EVENT_PRETHAW PM_EVENT_QUIESCE
 575
 576/*
 577 * One transition is triggered by resume(), after a suspend() call; the
 578 * message is implicit:
 579 *
 580 * ON           Driver starts working again, responding to hardware events
 581 *              and software requests.  The hardware may have gone through
 582 *              a power-off reset, or it may have maintained state from the
 583 *              previous suspend() which the driver will rely on while
 584 *              resuming.  On most platforms, there are no restrictions on
 585 *              availability of resources like clocks during resume().
 586 *
 587 * Other transitions are triggered by messages sent using suspend().  All
 588 * these transitions quiesce the driver, so that I/O queues are inactive.
 589 * That commonly entails turning off IRQs and DMA; there may be rules
 590 * about how to quiesce that are specific to the bus or the device's type.
 591 * (For example, network drivers mark the link state.)  Other details may
 592 * differ according to the message:
 593 *
 594 * SUSPEND      Quiesce, enter a low power device state appropriate for
 595 *              the upcoming system state (such as PCI_D3hot), and enable
 596 *              wakeup events as appropriate.
 597 *
 598 * HIBERNATE    Enter a low power device state appropriate for the hibernation
 599 *              state (eg. ACPI S4) and enable wakeup events as appropriate.
 600 *
 601 * FREEZE       Quiesce operations so that a consistent image can be saved;
 602 *              but do NOT otherwise enter a low power device state, and do
 603 *              NOT emit system wakeup events.
 604 *
 605 * PRETHAW      Quiesce as if for FREEZE; additionally, prepare for restoring
 606 *              the system from a snapshot taken after an earlier FREEZE.
 607 *              Some drivers will need to reset their hardware state instead
 608 *              of preserving it, to ensure that it's never mistaken for the
 609 *              state which that earlier snapshot had set up.
 610 *
 611 * A minimally power-aware driver treats all messages as SUSPEND, fully
 612 * reinitializes its device during resume() -- whether or not it was reset
 613 * during the suspend/resume cycle -- and can't issue wakeup events.
 614 *
 615 * More power-aware drivers may also use low power states at runtime as
 616 * well as during system sleep states like PM_SUSPEND_STANDBY.  They may
 617 * be able to use wakeup events to exit from runtime low-power states,
 618 * or from system low-power states such as standby or suspend-to-RAM.
 619 */
 620
 621#ifdef CONFIG_PM_SLEEP
 622extern void device_pm_lock(void);
 623extern void dpm_resume_start(pm_message_t state);
 624extern void dpm_resume_end(pm_message_t state);
 625extern void dpm_resume(pm_message_t state);
 626extern void dpm_complete(pm_message_t state);
 627
 628extern void device_pm_unlock(void);
 629extern int dpm_suspend_end(pm_message_t state);
 630extern int dpm_suspend_start(pm_message_t state);
 631extern int dpm_suspend(pm_message_t state);
 632extern int dpm_prepare(pm_message_t state);
 633
 634extern void __suspend_report_result(const char *function, void *fn, int ret);
 635
 636#define suspend_report_result(fn, ret)                                  \
 637        do {                                                            \
 638                __suspend_report_result(__func__, fn, ret);             \
 639        } while (0)
 640
 641extern int device_pm_wait_for_dev(struct device *sub, struct device *dev);
 642extern void dpm_for_each_dev(void *data, void (*fn)(struct device *, void *));
 643
 644extern int pm_generic_prepare(struct device *dev);
 645extern int pm_generic_suspend_late(struct device *dev);
 646extern int pm_generic_suspend_noirq(struct device *dev);
 647extern int pm_generic_suspend(struct device *dev);
 648extern int pm_generic_resume_early(struct device *dev);
 649extern int pm_generic_resume_noirq(struct device *dev);
 650extern int pm_generic_resume(struct device *dev);
 651extern int pm_generic_freeze_noirq(struct device *dev);
 652extern int pm_generic_freeze_late(struct device *dev);
 653extern int pm_generic_freeze(struct device *dev);
 654extern int pm_generic_thaw_noirq(struct device *dev);
 655extern int pm_generic_thaw_early(struct device *dev);
 656extern int pm_generic_thaw(struct device *dev);
 657extern int pm_generic_restore_noirq(struct device *dev);
 658extern int pm_generic_restore_early(struct device *dev);
 659extern int pm_generic_restore(struct device *dev);
 660extern int pm_generic_poweroff_noirq(struct device *dev);
 661extern int pm_generic_poweroff_late(struct device *dev);
 662extern int pm_generic_poweroff(struct device *dev);
 663extern void pm_generic_complete(struct device *dev);
 664
 665#else /* !CONFIG_PM_SLEEP */
 666
 667#define device_pm_lock() do {} while (0)
 668#define device_pm_unlock() do {} while (0)
 669
 670static inline int dpm_suspend_start(pm_message_t state)
 671{
 672        return 0;
 673}
 674
 675#define suspend_report_result(fn, ret)          do {} while (0)
 676
 677static inline int device_pm_wait_for_dev(struct device *a, struct device *b)
 678{
 679        return 0;
 680}
 681
 682static inline void dpm_for_each_dev(void *data, void (*fn)(struct device *, void *))
 683{
 684}
 685
 686#define pm_generic_prepare      NULL
 687#define pm_generic_suspend      NULL
 688#define pm_generic_resume       NULL
 689#define pm_generic_freeze       NULL
 690#define pm_generic_thaw         NULL
 691#define pm_generic_restore      NULL
 692#define pm_generic_poweroff     NULL
 693#define pm_generic_complete     NULL
 694#endif /* !CONFIG_PM_SLEEP */
 695
 696/* How to reorder dpm_list after device_move() */
 697enum dpm_order {
 698        DPM_ORDER_NONE,
 699        DPM_ORDER_DEV_AFTER_PARENT,
 700        DPM_ORDER_PARENT_BEFORE_DEV,
 701        DPM_ORDER_DEV_LAST,
 702};
 703
 704#endif /* _LINUX_PM_H */
 705
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