linux/net/Kconfig
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   1#
   2# Network configuration
   3#
   4
   5menuconfig NET
   6        bool "Networking support"
   7        select NLATTR
   8        ---help---
   9          Unless you really know what you are doing, you should say Y here.
  10          The reason is that some programs need kernel networking support even
  11          when running on a stand-alone machine that isn't connected to any
  12          other computer.
  13          
  14          If you are upgrading from an older kernel, you
  15          should consider updating your networking tools too because changes
  16          in the kernel and the tools often go hand in hand. The tools are
  17          contained in the package net-tools, the location and version number
  18          of which are given in <file:Documentation/Changes>.
  19
  20          For a general introduction to Linux networking, it is highly
  21          recommended to read the NET-HOWTO, available from
  22          <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>.
  23
  24if NET
  25
  26config WANT_COMPAT_NETLINK_MESSAGES
  27        bool
  28        help
  29          This option can be selected by other options that need compat
  30          netlink messages.
  31
  32config COMPAT_NETLINK_MESSAGES
  33        def_bool y
  34        depends on COMPAT
  35        depends on WEXT_CORE || WANT_COMPAT_NETLINK_MESSAGES
  36        help
  37          This option makes it possible to send different netlink messages
  38          to tasks depending on whether the task is a compat task or not. To
  39          achieve this, you need to set skb_shinfo(skb)->frag_list to the
  40          compat skb before sending the skb, the netlink code will sort out
  41          which message to actually pass to the task.
  42
  43          Newly written code should NEVER need this option but do
  44          compat-independent messages instead!
  45
  46menu "Networking options"
  47
  48source "net/packet/Kconfig"
  49source "net/unix/Kconfig"
  50source "net/xfrm/Kconfig"
  51source "net/iucv/Kconfig"
  52
  53config INET
  54        bool "TCP/IP networking"
  55        ---help---
  56          These are the protocols used on the Internet and on most local
  57          Ethernets. It is highly recommended to say Y here (this will enlarge
  58          your kernel by about 400 KB), since some programs (e.g. the X window
  59          system) use TCP/IP even if your machine is not connected to any
  60          other computer. You will get the so-called loopback device which
  61          allows you to ping yourself (great fun, that!).
  62
  63          For an excellent introduction to Linux networking, please read the
  64          Linux Networking HOWTO, available from
  65          <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>.
  66
  67          If you say Y here and also to "/proc file system support" and
  68          "Sysctl support" below, you can change various aspects of the
  69          behavior of the TCP/IP code by writing to the (virtual) files in
  70          /proc/sys/net/ipv4/*; the options are explained in the file
  71          <file:Documentation/networking/ip-sysctl.txt>.
  72
  73          Short answer: say Y.
  74
  75if INET
  76source "net/ipv4/Kconfig"
  77source "net/ipv6/Kconfig"
  78source "net/netlabel/Kconfig"
  79
  80endif # if INET
  81
  82config NETWORK_SECMARK
  83        bool "Security Marking"
  84        help
  85          This enables security marking of network packets, similar
  86          to nfmark, but designated for security purposes.
  87          If you are unsure how to answer this question, answer N.
  88
  89config NETWORK_PHY_TIMESTAMPING
  90        bool "Timestamping in PHY devices"
  91        depends on EXPERIMENTAL
  92        help
  93          This allows timestamping of network packets by PHYs with
  94          hardware timestamping capabilities. This option adds some
  95          overhead in the transmit and receive paths.
  96
  97          If you are unsure how to answer this question, answer N.
  98
  99menuconfig NETFILTER
 100        bool "Network packet filtering framework (Netfilter)"
 101        ---help---
 102          Netfilter is a framework for filtering and mangling network packets
 103          that pass through your Linux box.
 104
 105          The most common use of packet filtering is to run your Linux box as
 106          a firewall protecting a local network from the Internet. The type of
 107          firewall provided by this kernel support is called a "packet
 108          filter", which means that it can reject individual network packets
 109          based on type, source, destination etc. The other kind of firewall,
 110          a "proxy-based" one, is more secure but more intrusive and more
 111          bothersome to set up; it inspects the network traffic much more
 112          closely, modifies it and has knowledge about the higher level
 113          protocols, which a packet filter lacks. Moreover, proxy-based
 114          firewalls often require changes to the programs running on the local
 115          clients. Proxy-based firewalls don't need support by the kernel, but
 116          they are often combined with a packet filter, which only works if
 117          you say Y here.
 118
 119          You should also say Y here if you intend to use your Linux box as
 120          the gateway to the Internet for a local network of machines without
 121          globally valid IP addresses. This is called "masquerading": if one
 122          of the computers on your local network wants to send something to
 123          the outside, your box can "masquerade" as that computer, i.e. it
 124          forwards the traffic to the intended outside destination, but
 125          modifies the packets to make it look like they came from the
 126          firewall box itself. It works both ways: if the outside host
 127          replies, the Linux box will silently forward the traffic to the
 128          correct local computer. This way, the computers on your local net
 129          are completely invisible to the outside world, even though they can
 130          reach the outside and can receive replies. It is even possible to
 131          run globally visible servers from within a masqueraded local network
 132          using a mechanism called portforwarding. Masquerading is also often
 133          called NAT (Network Address Translation).
 134
 135          Another use of Netfilter is in transparent proxying: if a machine on
 136          the local network tries to connect to an outside host, your Linux
 137          box can transparently forward the traffic to a local server,
 138          typically a caching proxy server.
 139
 140          Yet another use of Netfilter is building a bridging firewall. Using
 141          a bridge with Network packet filtering enabled makes iptables "see"
 142          the bridged traffic. For filtering on the lower network and Ethernet
 143          protocols over the bridge, use ebtables (under bridge netfilter
 144          configuration).
 145
 146          Various modules exist for netfilter which replace the previous
 147          masquerading (ipmasqadm), packet filtering (ipchains), transparent
 148          proxying, and portforwarding mechanisms. Please see
 149          <file:Documentation/Changes> under "iptables" for the location of
 150          these packages.
 151
 152if NETFILTER
 153
 154config NETFILTER_DEBUG
 155        bool "Network packet filtering debugging"
 156        depends on NETFILTER
 157        help
 158          You can say Y here if you want to get additional messages useful in
 159          debugging the netfilter code.
 160
 161config NETFILTER_ADVANCED
 162        bool "Advanced netfilter configuration"
 163        depends on NETFILTER
 164        default y
 165        help
 166          If you say Y here you can select between all the netfilter modules.
 167          If you say N the more unusual ones will not be shown and the
 168          basic ones needed by most people will default to 'M'.
 169
 170          If unsure, say Y.
 171
 172config BRIDGE_NETFILTER
 173        bool "Bridged IP/ARP packets filtering"
 174        depends on BRIDGE && NETFILTER && INET
 175        depends on NETFILTER_ADVANCED
 176        default y
 177        ---help---
 178          Enabling this option will let arptables resp. iptables see bridged
 179          ARP resp. IP traffic. If you want a bridging firewall, you probably
 180          want this option enabled.
 181          Enabling or disabling this option doesn't enable or disable
 182          ebtables.
 183
 184          If unsure, say N.
 185
 186source "net/netfilter/Kconfig"
 187source "net/ipv4/netfilter/Kconfig"
 188source "net/ipv6/netfilter/Kconfig"
 189source "net/decnet/netfilter/Kconfig"
 190source "net/bridge/netfilter/Kconfig"
 191
 192endif
 193
 194source "net/dccp/Kconfig"
 195source "net/sctp/Kconfig"
 196source "net/rds/Kconfig"
 197source "net/tipc/Kconfig"
 198source "net/atm/Kconfig"
 199source "net/l2tp/Kconfig"
 200source "net/802/Kconfig"
 201source "net/bridge/Kconfig"
 202source "net/dsa/Kconfig"
 203source "net/8021q/Kconfig"
 204source "net/decnet/Kconfig"
 205source "net/llc/Kconfig"
 206source "net/ipx/Kconfig"
 207source "drivers/net/appletalk/Kconfig"
 208source "net/x25/Kconfig"
 209source "net/lapb/Kconfig"
 210source "net/econet/Kconfig"
 211source "net/wanrouter/Kconfig"
 212source "net/phonet/Kconfig"
 213source "net/ieee802154/Kconfig"
 214source "net/sched/Kconfig"
 215source "net/dcb/Kconfig"
 216source "net/dns_resolver/Kconfig"
 217source "net/batman-adv/Kconfig"
 218
 219config RPS
 220        boolean
 221        depends on SMP && SYSFS && USE_GENERIC_SMP_HELPERS
 222        default y
 223
 224config RFS_ACCEL
 225        boolean
 226        depends on RPS && GENERIC_HARDIRQS
 227        select CPU_RMAP
 228        default y
 229
 230config XPS
 231        boolean
 232        depends on SMP && SYSFS && USE_GENERIC_SMP_HELPERS
 233        default y
 234
 235config HAVE_BPF_JIT
 236        bool
 237
 238config BPF_JIT
 239        bool "enable BPF Just In Time compiler"
 240        depends on HAVE_BPF_JIT
 241        depends on MODULES
 242        ---help---
 243          Berkeley Packet Filter filtering capabilities are normally handled
 244          by an interpreter. This option allows kernel to generate a native
 245          code when filter is loaded in memory. This should speedup
 246          packet sniffing (libpcap/tcpdump). Note : Admin should enable
 247          this feature changing /proc/sys/net/core/bpf_jit_enable
 248
 249menu "Network testing"
 250
 251config NET_PKTGEN
 252        tristate "Packet Generator (USE WITH CAUTION)"
 253        depends on PROC_FS
 254        ---help---
 255          This module will inject preconfigured packets, at a configurable
 256          rate, out of a given interface.  It is used for network interface
 257          stress testing and performance analysis.  If you don't understand
 258          what was just said, you don't need it: say N.
 259
 260          Documentation on how to use the packet generator can be found
 261          at <file:Documentation/networking/pktgen.txt>.
 262
 263          To compile this code as a module, choose M here: the
 264          module will be called pktgen.
 265
 266config NET_TCPPROBE
 267        tristate "TCP connection probing"
 268        depends on INET && EXPERIMENTAL && PROC_FS && KPROBES
 269        ---help---
 270        This module allows for capturing the changes to TCP connection
 271        state in response to incoming packets. It is used for debugging
 272        TCP congestion avoidance modules. If you don't understand
 273        what was just said, you don't need it: say N.
 274
 275        Documentation on how to use TCP connection probing can be found
 276        at:
 277        
 278          http://www.linuxfoundation.org/collaborate/workgroups/networking/tcpprobe
 279
 280        To compile this code as a module, choose M here: the
 281        module will be called tcp_probe.
 282
 283config NET_DROP_MONITOR
 284        boolean "Network packet drop alerting service"
 285        depends on INET && EXPERIMENTAL && TRACEPOINTS
 286        ---help---
 287        This feature provides an alerting service to userspace in the
 288        event that packets are discarded in the network stack.  Alerts
 289        are broadcast via netlink socket to any listening user space
 290        process.  If you don't need network drop alerts, or if you are ok
 291        just checking the various proc files and other utilities for
 292        drop statistics, say N here.
 293
 294endmenu
 295
 296endmenu
 297
 298source "net/ax25/Kconfig"
 299source "net/can/Kconfig"
 300source "net/irda/Kconfig"
 301source "net/bluetooth/Kconfig"
 302source "net/rxrpc/Kconfig"
 303
 304config FIB_RULES
 305        bool
 306
 307menuconfig WIRELESS
 308        bool "Wireless"
 309        depends on !S390
 310        default y
 311
 312if WIRELESS
 313
 314source "net/wireless/Kconfig"
 315source "net/mac80211/Kconfig"
 316
 317endif # WIRELESS
 318
 319source "net/wimax/Kconfig"
 320
 321source "net/rfkill/Kconfig"
 322source "net/9p/Kconfig"
 323source "net/caif/Kconfig"
 324source "net/ceph/Kconfig"
 325source "net/nfc/Kconfig"
 326
 327
 328endif   # if NET
 329
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